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Lojwa Animals - The Few, The Forgotten, the "Rat's"


How a bunch of young, high energy and crazy people came together in 1977 through 1980 to serve the USA, have some fun, and make long lasting friendships.  We endured, survived, so far! 


In 1977, a coalition of United States military forces and civilian support teams were sanctioned to ‘clean’ the islands of residual radioactive fallout.


Men, many who were mere teenagers back in the day, were tasked with cleaning the contaminated fallout from the nuclear testing that occurred throughout the previous three decades





Keep in mind, that as recent as 2012, the United Nations reported that the cumulative effects from all that nuclear testing had effectively caused near-irreversible environmental contamination. There was a problem beginning in 1977 and currently, effects from that exposure have begun to manifest, taking toll on many surviving Enewetak vets and contractors today. Four decades later, survivors are telling their stories because the world needs to know.

We endured, survived, so far! God willing we will see success with the congressional approval and law for the Atomic Veterans Healthcare Parity Act. 



Where is Enewetak Atoll?


Enewetak is just one of many atolls and islands in the Pacific Ocean’s Marshall Island chain. Located about 2,365 nautical miles SW of Hawaii (just north of the equator), the Marshall Islands were once a major testing ground for nuclear weapons post WWII.


This island chain is also home to the project called Cactus Dome, a 350’- wide blast crater located at the northern end of Runit Island that has become known as the ‘Nuclear Trashcan of the Pacific.’





Between 1948-58, forty-three nuclear weapons were detonated over Enewetak and its sister islands. Among these tests were ‘Ivy Mike’ and ‘Castle Bravo’ (a device 1000X as powerful as the bomb ‘Little Boy’ which was dropped on Hiroshima, Japan post Pearl Harbor.)

In 1977, a coalition of United States military forces and civilian support teams were sanctioned to ‘clean’ the islands of residual radioactive fallout. Men, many who were mere teenagers back in the day, were tasked with cleaning the contaminated fallout from the nuclear testing that occurred throughout the previous three decades. Keep in mind, that as recent as 2012, the United Nations reported that the cumulative effects from all that nuclear testing had effectively caused near-irreversible environmental contamination.


There was a problem beginning in 1977 and currently, effects from that exposure have begun to manifest, taking toll on many surviving Enewetak vets and contractors today. Four decades later, survivors are telling their stories because the world needs to know.






The Current inhabitants of Enewetak in 2010.


News and updates can be read on the Personal Blog of Jeff A Fortin.

https://jfortin670.wixsite.com/enewetak/blog-1


Further information on the Enewetak Cleanup Veterans and their stories can be found by clicking the images below:






Information for this blog was taken from multiple websites, to highlight the injustice facing the Clean up crews who although they did not witness a Nuclear detonation, were exposed to hazardous material and dangerous levels to clean up the mess caused by the Governments. Clean ups have taken place all over the world, including Australia and Christmas Island, leaving the servicemen and civilians changed forever.


The US Government have announced they are going to spend $1.7 million dollars analysing the Dome and any leakage. It is a shame that they cannot support their own veterans.


Please support these men as much as possible, they did their duty, it is time for them to be recognised.



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